iLRN 2016 Special Tracks

Special tracks are held in parallel with the main conference and are an integral part of the annual worldwide gathering. They provide researchers in focused areas the opportunity to meet and present their work. Special track papers are required to meet the same standards as papers in the general conference and are published in iLRN’s conference proceedings.

Deadline for paper submission has been extended to March 14, 2016 (final).

To read more about each special track please click on its name in the tabs below:  

K-12 and School TechSRL-IEFuture EducationCSG 2016EcoCitiesIEEXP

ST1. K-­12 and School Tech

AECT logoOverview

Serious challenges exist for the integration of technology into the primary and secondary (K­-12) classroom. The students who utilize technology in the classroom are now more diverse than ever before. There were more English language learners (ELL) in school year 2012­-13 (9.2 percent) than in the previous ten years. From fall 2002 through fall 2012, the number of students receiving special education services in the United States under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) has increased 13 percent, with the highest increase in the area of specific learning disabilities.

Specific learning disabilities are defined as a psychological processes involved in understanding or using language, spoken or written (U.S. Department of Education, 2014). Clearly the need for differentiating, or meeting the needs of all learners, is a priority in classrooms today. The research on how teachers define and enact differentiation has been extensive in face­ to ­face classrooms (Archambault, et al, 1993; Westberg & Daoust, 2003).

In a differentiated classroom, teachers are guided by principles that include providing high quality curriculum, utilizing flexible grouping, and administering ongoing assessments within a classroom community that honors respectful and challenging tasks for all learners (Tomlinson, 2001; 2005). It is through the use of these principles that teachers respond to learner readiness, interest, and learning profile by accessing a variety of instructional strategies designed to meet the needs of all learners. Additionally, teachers in primary and secondary classrooms need to embrace best practices for classroom management in order to help students learn. This can mean many things, but specifically it involves embracing effective means of screening for at ­risk children and applying just ­in ­time therapeutic interventions for children who cause disruptions in the classroom.

Within the contexts of the current primary schooling (i.e. K­-12) landscape, Immersive Learning opportunities are trending up the “Slope of Enlightenment”. Virtual Worlds, Video Games, and Augmented Reality experiences specifically designed for learners within the formal school systems ­or as extra­curricular experiences tailored to improve student performance within these systems are on the rise. A plethora of devices and software applications created for students are currently being developed and offered to students. Some obviously better than others.

Unfortunately, although much research has been accomplished using immersive technologies in the primary and secondary classroom, it often has not fully considered the specific problems and opportunities related to the differentiation of instruction and classroom management. The purpose of this RFP is to address this topic through current, relevant, and situated immersive learning research in the primary and secondary classroom. For this special track of the iLRN conference, the editor is seeking submissions that address this need.


List of Topics

Suggested topics include—but are not limited to:

  • Address Growing Educational Interest in Game-Based and Immersive Learning.
  • Technologies suggested are: Desktop virtual world environments, Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), simulations, video games, neurogaming, immersive caves and domes, 3D printing, robotics, and more.
  • Use of immersive technologies to collect data for formative assessment in the classroom.
  • Use of Serious games to improve various aspects of learning.
  • Identify, improve, and scale sustainable, collaborative Immersive Learning solutions that improve student success.
  • Motivational and Engagement Aspects of Immersive Learning For Improving Students’ Persistence, Retention and Completion.
  • Immersive learning solutions for classroom management difficulties.
  • Differentiation of instruction through the use of immersive learning.
  • Immersive learning in alternative and informal learning environments.
  • Immersive, collections­based experiences using digital records and associated video and web assets to help learners create and share their own digital collections.
  • Ethical choices and frameworks for teachers’ decisions to use immersive learning in the classroom.
  • Exploration of specific immersive affordances (e.g. perspective taking, eye tracking, simulations, role play, etc.) in specific content areas and levels (e.g. primary, secondary).

Author Info

All papers (including papers selected for Springer publication, Online Proceedings and poster submissions) must follow Springer’s style guidelines.

Contributions are welcome as work-in-progress, research results, technical development, and best practices. Research, development, and best practices contributions will be accepted according to their quality and relevance either as full or short papers. Work-in-progress will only be accepted as short papers.

  • Full papers accepted for Springer publication must not exceed of 14 pages.
  • Long papers accepted for publication at Online Proceedings must not exceed of 10-12 pages.
  • Short papers accepted for publication at Online Proceedings must not exceed of 6 – 8 pages.
  • Poster submissions must be accompanied with a description not exceeding of 2 pages, which will be published in the Online Proceedings.

Submitted papers must follow the same guidelines as the main conference submissions. Please visit https://immersivelrn.org/ilrn2016/author-info/ for guidelines and templates.

For submitting a paper to this special track, please use the submission system https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ilrn2016 , log in with an account or register, and select the track “Special Track 1: K12 and School Tech” to add your submission.

Deadline for Submissions: March 14, 2016 (final)

Do not send manuscripts to the Chair. The manuscripts must go through a double blind review process. Note: Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project. Authors are encouraged to contact the Editor to propose an idea for submission to ensure the appropriateness of the proposed study for this venue.


Special Track Chairs

Dr. Dennis Beck – AECT Division of School Media and Technology, USA

Dr. Yvonne Earnshaw – Texas Tech University

Contact: debeck@uark.edu

Program Committee

To be announced

ST2. Self-Regulated Learning in Immersive Environments

Overview

Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) is an individual’s active and conscious control of his/her own learning activity. It is characterized by strategic action and motivation, as well as by awareness of personal learning aims, beliefs, style, needs, knowledge and achievements. The literature has highlighted that the ability to self-regulate is a necessary ingredient of learners’ versatility and that it is crucial to make people able to successfully cope with the demands of both formal education and life-long learning.

The literature also shows that self-regulation can be taught, starting from early childhood, but it also highlights that its acquisition and improvement needs to be fostered by means of conducive learning environments and activities. Self-regulation skills are context-dependent: a learner who is skilful at self-regulating in one context may not be as capable in a different one. It is therefore advisable that teachers, learning designers and environment developers pay attention to the support they are providing to facilitate and foster students’ practice of self-regulation.

Immersive Learning (IL) environments have peculiar features that distinguish them from other kinds of learning environments. Do such features provide support to the development, or practice, of SRL, or are they indifferent, or do they even hinder such development? This question has so far been scarcely (if at all) explored in the literature, but addressing it is crucial to the development of both research fields.

This Special Track aims to discuss concrete examples (or well detailed scenarios/vignettes) concerning any level and type of formal and informal learning, apt to highlight if and how immersion and self-regulation can foster each other. It aims to be a moment of joint reflection, so as to possibly contribute to the development of effective IL environments, as well as to a deeper understanding of how SRL skills are acquired.


Author Info

All papers (including papers selected for Springer publication, Online Proceedings and poster submissions) must follow Springer’s style guidelines.

Contributions are welcome as work-in-progress, research results, technical development, and best practices. Research, development, and best practices contributions will be accepted according to their quality and relevance either as full or short papers. Work-in-progress will only be accepted as short papers.

  • Full papers accepted for Springer publication must not exceed of 14 pages.
  • Long papers accepted for publication at Online Proceedings must not exceed of 10-12 pages.
  • Short papers accepted for publication at Online Proceedings must not exceed of 6 – 8 pages.
  • Poster submissions must be accompanied with a description not exceeding of 2 pages, which will be published in the Online Proceedings.

Submitted papers must follow the same guidelines as the main conference submissions. Please visit https://immersivelrn.org/ilrn2016/author-info/ for guidelines and templates.

For submitting a paper to this special track, please use the submission system https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ilrn2016 , log in with an account or register, and select the track “Special Track 2: Self-Regulated Learning in Immersive Environments” to add your submission.

Deadline for Submissions: March 14, 2016 (final)

Each proposal will be sent to three reviewers with different competence. Attention will be paid that the proposals concern both SRL and IL, not just one of the two fields.


Special Track Chair

Giuliana Dettori – Institute for Educational Technology, Italy’s National Research Council (ITD-CNR) Genoa, Italy

Program Committee 

  • Stefania Bocconi, ITD-CNR, Italy
  • Monica Divitini, NTNU, Norway
  • Mary English, Northeastern University, USA
  • Jesús de la Fuente Arias, University of Almeria, Spain
  • Leonel Morgado, UAB, Portugal
  • Elena Railean, Academy of Sciences, Moldova
  • Yi Fei Wang, UBC, Canada

ST3. The Future of Education (Future Education)

Overview

The focus of this special track will be to explore the possible ways immersive-reality technology might change future education. In this we take a very broad vision for the delivery of education stretching from formal education at (say) university through industrial training to informal lifelong learning. The special track will seek to engage with the immersive education community in providing an opportunity for authors to write imaginative accounts of how they foresee immersive learning technologies and pedagogies changing the nature of future education. While the track will encourage papers that make use of the Science-Fiction Prototyping methodology, it will be open to any narrative vision of the future education. This proposal is part of a vision for a 3-way event exploring the future impact of immersive learning technologies on education; the two other events being a hands-on workshop and a competition.


Author Info

All papers (including papers selected for Springer publication, Online Proceedings and poster submissions) must follow Springer’s style guidelines.

Contributions are welcome as work-in-progress, research results, technical development, and best practices. Research, development, and best practices contributions will be accepted according to their quality and relevance either as full or short papers. Work-in-progress will only be accepted as short papers.

  • Full papers accepted for Springer publication must not exceed of 14 pages.
  • Long papers accepted for publication at Online Proceedings must not exceed of 10-12 pages.
  • Short papers accepted for publication at Online Proceedings must not exceed of 6 – 8 pages.
  • Poster submissions must be accompanied with a description not exceeding of 2 pages, which will be published in the Online Proceedings.

Submitted papers must follow the same guidelines as the main conference submissions. Please visit https://immersivelrn.org/ilrn2016/author-info/ for guidelines and templates.

For submitting a paper to this special track, please use the submission system https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ilrn2016 , log in with an account or register, and select the track “Special Track 3: The Future Of Education” to add your submission.

Deadline for Submissions: March 14, 2016 (final)

Standard reviewing procedures will be adopted using a programme committee drawn from both the Creative-Science and iLRN communities (we will not contact them before we know if this track is approved, but the application are well connected and assembling this committee will not be a problem). Submission and reviewing deadlines will be set to match those outlined in the main conference


Special Track Chairs

  • Vic Callaghan, University of Essex, UK
  • Michael Gardner, University of Essex, UK
  • Jonathon Richter, Salish Kootenai College, USA

Program Committee

To be announced

ST4. Cognitive Serious Gaming (CSG)

Overview

Recent years have seen a rapid proliferation of serious games as they provide the context in which participants can dunk and experience a simulated environment as real, as they can achieve rich and complex content-based interaction. Serious games including simulations and immersive environments, have the potential to be an important teaching tool because they involve learners in interactive, engaging and immersive activities that allow them to practice and improve technical, practical and creative skills. To achieve this serious games use advanced interfaces close to game quality, creativity, and advanced technology to meet training objectives, but these principles alone will not guarantee that the intended learning occurs. To be an effective educational tool, serious games must couple advanced technological interventions with sound cognitive, learning, and pedagogical principles into their design and structure.

This special session aims to explore how cognitive principles can be applied to improve the training effectiveness in serious games. Papers that explore the design and development of serious games that automatically process and manage effectively the content and context in which learning takes place to support formal and informal learning both for teacher’s training and student’s learning would be of special research interest. Therefore, we invite practitioners and researchers alike to submit papers under the following topics.


List of Topics

  • Serious games[1] in training and education
  • Natural Language and serious games (with focus in training and education)
  • Al in serious games for training/education
  • Context aware (e.g., location, user performance, preferences, state of the game, other) serious games
  • Cognitive and pedagogical principles / issues / aspects of serious games
  • Empathy and serious games / educational games
  • User centred serious game design
  • Gamified education/training applications
  • Advanced Interface (Virtual/Augmented Reality, pervasive) and applications for training.
  • New interactive hardware for immersive support in game learning.

Author Info

All papers (including papers selected for Springer publication, Online Proceedings and poster submissions) must follow Springer’s style guidelines.

Contributions are welcome as work-in-progress, research results, technical development, and best practices. Research, development, and best practices contributions will be accepted according to their quality and relevance either as full or short papers. Work-in-progress will only be accepted as short papers.

  • Full papers accepted for Springer publication must not exceed of 14 pages.
  • Long papers accepted for publication at Online Proceedings must not exceed of 10-12 pages.
  • Short papers accepted for publication at Online Proceedings must not exceed of 6 – 8 pages.
  • Poster submissions must be accompanied with a description not exceeding of 2 pages, which will be published in the Online Proceedings.

Submitted papers must follow the same guidelines as the main conference submissions. Please visit https://immersivelrn.org/ilrn2016/author-info/ for guidelines and templates.

For submitting a paper to this special track, please use the submission system https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ilrn2016 , log in with an account or register, and select the track “Special Track 4: Cognitive Serious Gaming (CSG)” to add your submission.

Deadline for Submissions: March 14, 2016 (final)


Special Track Chairs

  • Markos Mentzelopoulos, University of Westminster, UK
  • Daphne Economou, University of Westminster, UK
  • Vassiliki Bouki, University of Westminster, UK
  • Aristidis Protopsaltis, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität, Germany
  • Ioannis Doumanis, CTVC Ltd, UK

For questions regarding the special track contact us

M. Mentzelopoulos: mentzem@westminster.ac.uk

D. Economou: d.economou@westminster.ac.uk

Program Committee (to be confirmed)

  • Mark Baldwin, University of Westminster, UK
  • Tom Boyle, London Metropolitan University, UK
  • Paul Brna, University of Edinburgh, UK
  • Charalampos Karagiannidis, University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece
  • Petros Lameras, Serious Games Institute, UK
  • Panagiotis Petridis, Aston University, UK
  • Thrasyvoulos Tsiatsos, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
[1] We refer to an ecosystem of platform and devices (desktop, mobile, iTV) that support serious games and also 2D or 3D environments.

ST5: EcoCities “Learning the City from the Inside Out”

ECB Logo Color

Overview

There is a growing need for detailed and accurate data and information about local urban environmental conditions, as well as social and economic conditions that affect both the immediate quality of life for residents and the long-term resilience and sustainability of

GeoSUMR logourban areas and their resource bases. This information is a key driver in sustainable policy, decision-making and urban management — from the scale and use of the citizen and neighborhood, to the city, region, and beyond. Alongside the demand for data there is an equal need to accelerate learning across cities to help scale the adoption and replication of sustainable urban solutions based on local needs assessments and priorities.

For these reasons and more, Oakland California based nonprofit Ecocity Builders is developing Urbinsight, an online dynamic platform that visualizes multiple data Thinglink_logo_transparent types and facilitates city-to-citizen a
nd city-to-city cooperation, knowledge sharing and engagement, leading to solutions that enhance both human and natural systems through Geodesign and other sustainable interventions and clean technologies. (Pioneered by Esri, Geodesign provides a design framework and supporting technology to steven poeleverage geographic information, resulting in designs that more closely follow natural systems).

Urbinsight introductory video: https://vimeo.com/108318978

Data are collected and shared through an experiential and participatory action research and learning method called the EcoCompass. Through this process, EcoCitizens are born who can plan for interventions that enhance the sustainability and equitability of their neighborhoods and cities.

Experiential learning is a well-known model in education. Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory (Kolb, 1984) defines experiential learning as “the process whereby knowledge is created through the transformation of experience. Knowledge results from the combination of grasping and transforming experience.”

360º video and photography combined as live action VR on the visual web are an increasingly popular means of sharing experiences and knowledge. Immersive environments created by these technologies engender a sense of connectedness, detail and intimacy. Immersive multimedia simulating a physical presence in places in the real world allows the user to interact and learn about it in a way that would not otherwise be possible without actually being there.

One of the ways in which Urbinsight will provide experiential tools and training is through a resource library that offers virtual tours of sustainable projects in cities around the world. These virtual tours will be embedded with links to additional information, data and knowledge portals, and to other linked virtual destinations. Visual immersion using relatively inexpensive and accessible technologies has the potential to give decision makers and service providers a more concrete feel for the potential utility and suitability of a wide range of sustainable interventions and innovations to improve the health and resilience of communities. It makes far-away places with potential local solutions more discoverable.

The idea of virtual field trips is not new. The introduction of technology like Google’s virtual-reality kits for classrooms highlights the growing importance of the education sector to major technology companies.

With Google Expeditions, Google engineers worked with teachers to develop virtual-reality field trips based on course curriculums. Google Expeditions uses 360-degree views that stitch together photographs from Google Street View, a product that displays images of roads. The company is also using a 16-camera system, built by GoPro, to create 3D 360º video images for the virtual excursions. The Google kits available to schools contain the company’s cardboard viewers along with Asus smartphones to be used as virtual field-trip screens for students.

As another example, ThingLink is an interactive media platform that empowers publishers, educators, brands, and bloggers to create more engaging content by adding rich media links to photos and videos. The technology additionally lets the creator track how people interact with the content as it spreads across the web.

Call for Papers and Demos: Within the contexts of the current participatory urban research landscape, immersive learning opportunities are likely to be trending up. Although a considerable body of research has been accomplished using immersive technologies in the primary and secondary classroom, it has not widely considered the specific problems and opportunities related to city-to-citizen and city-to-city knowledge sharing involving multiple stakeholders and potential urban interventions from the scale of the household and parcel to the scale of the city and region. This track will explore how these technologies can be used and have been used within the urban context.

The purpose of this RFP is to address this topic, through current, relevant, and situated immersive learning research and demonstrations. For this special track of the iLRN conference, we are seeking submissions that address this need.


List of Topics and Inquiries

The ILRN 2016 Conference EcoCities Special Track Chairs are looking for both papers and immersive demos addressing best practices for interactive virtual reality tours of sustainable urban systems from cities around the world using 360º video and photography and virtual reality (VR) as well as tagged 360 panorama images. In addition, submissions should research and report on how the interactive content overlay in the virtual environment impacts the viewers experience; in what ways does it enhance or detract?

Encouraged to apply: photographers, videographers, academics and researchers in immersive and virtual environments, computing and communication, smart environments, city planners, architects, government and policy makers, and others who might have context and insight into this theme.


Author Info

All papers (including papers selected for Springer publication, Online Proceedings and poster submissions) must follow Springer’s style guidelines.

Contributions are welcome as work-in-progress, research results, technical development, and best practices. Research, development, and best practices contributions will be accepted according to their quality and relevance either as full or short papers. Work-in-progress will only be accepted as short papers.

  • Full papers accepted for Springer publication must not exceed of 14 pages.
  • Long papers accepted for publication at Online Proceedings must not exceed of 10-12 pages.
  • Short papers accepted for publication at Online Proceedings must not exceed of 6 – 8 pages.
  • Poster submissions must be accompanied with a description not exceeding of 2 pages, which will be published in the Online Proceedings.

Submitted papers must follow the same guidelines as the main conference submissions. Please visit https://immersivelrn.org/ilrn2016/author-info/ for guidelines and templates.

For submitting a paper to this special track, please use the submission system https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ilrn2016 , log in with an account or register, and select the track “Special Track 5: EcoCities” to add your submission.

Deadline for Submissions: Combined special track (scientific full papers) due March 14, 2016 (final). All other contributions due April 30 2016.

Do not send manuscripts to the Chairs. The manuscripts must go through a double blind review process.

Note: Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project. Authors are encouraged to contact the Editor to propose an idea for submission to ensure the appropriateness of the proposed study for this venue.


Special Track Chairs

 

ST6: Immersive and Engaging Educational Experiences

 

Overview

Immersive and engaging experiences are powerful teaching tools and allow innovative forms of learning. More and more virtual reality platforms, virtual world environments and game-based experiences are designed for the classroom. This can be a traditional classroom, or also a virtual and remote classroom setting.

In this special track we discuss how we can design, develop, and analyze educational environments to be immersive and engaging. The track does not only cover research on design, development, and analysis of such environments, we also invite submission describing non-traditional traditional design practice and development approaches to create different engaging experiences.

Topics

The topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Learning: learning in immersive environments, virtual realities, virtual worlds, and games
  • Design: design techniques, practices, methods
  • Analysis: frameworks, exploration studies, user studies
  • Technology: platforms, devices, engines, environments, graphics, navigation, interactions, user analysis, data analysis, procedural content generation, artificial intelligence
  • Non-traditional, non-classroom and non-curricular learning environments
  • Development approaches to create different engaging experiences

Author Info

All papers (including papers selected for Springer publication, Online Proceedings and poster submissions) must follow Springer’s style guidelines.

Contributions are welcome as work-in-progress, research results, technical development, and best practices. Research, development, and best practices contributions will be accepted according to their quality and relevance either as full or short papers. Work-in-progress will only be accepted as short papers.

  • Full papers accepted for Springer publication must not exceed of 14 pages.
  • Long papers accepted for publication at Online Proceedings must not exceed of 10-12 pages.
  • Short papers accepted for publication at Online Proceedings must not exceed of 6 – 8 pages.
  • Poster submissions must be accompanied with a description not exceeding of 2 pages, which will be published in the Online Proceedings.

Submitted papers must follow the same guidelines as the main conference submissions. Please visit https://immersivelrn.org/ilrn2016/author-info/ for guidelines and templates.

For submitting a paper to this special track, please use the submission system https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ilrn2016 , log in with an account or register, and select the track “Special Track 6: Immersive and Engaging Educational Experiences (IEEXP)” to add your submission.

  • Deadline for Submissions EXTENDED: March 24th, 2016
  • Author Notification: April 17th, 2016

Special Track Chairs

  • Johanna Pirker, Graz University of Technology, Austria
  • Foaad Khosmood, California Polytechnic State University, CA
  • Kai Erenli, University of Applied Sciences BFI Vienna, Austria
  • Britte H. Cheng, SRI International, CA
  • Maroof Fakhri, Labster, Denmark
  • Zoë J. Wood, California Polytechnic State University, CA

Program Committee (to be extended)

  • Allan Fowler, Kennesaw State University
  • Brian Mcdonald, Glasgow Caledonian University, UK
  • Dominic Kao, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA
  • Kai Erenli, UAS bfi Vienna, Austria
  • Ralf Klamma, Aachen University, DE
  • Ryan Locke, Abertay University, UK
  • Volker Settgast, Fraunhofer Austria, Austria

Contact: jpirker@iicm.edu

 

Special Tracks Proposal